How Much Do Motorcycle Batteries Cost? (With 21 Examples)


With so many different motorcycle batteries on the market, it may be hard to determine what you should spend on a motorcycle battery.

Some motorcyclists may prefer the lead-acid type of motorcycle batteries while others lithium-ion batteries. 

However, the most important factor when it comes to purchasing a motorcycle battery is, of course, its price.

The battery’s quality is important, but one should also be aware of what is a fair price.

How much do motorcycle batteries cost? Motorcycle batteries can cost between $10 and $400, depending on the battery’s type and specifications. A lead-acid motorcycle battery might cost $80, while a lithium-ion motorcycle battery may be $200. Most AGM motorcycle battery prices usually start at $100.

If you are interested in finding more detailed information and a breakdown on how much do the different motorcycle batteries cost, continue reading below.

I get into further detail covering the most popular types of motorcycle batteries that are used by riders all over the world.

Motorcycle battery example prices

To get a better idea of some real-world examples, I have researched the prices of 21 of the most popular motorcycle batteries.

As a little disclaimer, I’d like to point out that these prices are for new motorcycle batteries from 2021. The prices may—and most certainly will—change in the future. I will keep them updated, but discrepancies may be present.

  1. Yuasa Yumicron Conventional Battery: $30 – $150
  2. Yuasa Conventional Battery: $35 – $135
  3. Motobatt 12V AGM Battery: $34 – $182
  4. Antigravity ATX-30 ReStart 880CA Lithium Ion Battery: $400
  5. Duraboost Conventional Battery: $10 – $90
  6. Yuasa AGM Battery: $45 – $180
  7. Antigravity ATX-20 ReStart 680CA Lithium Ion Battery: $320
  8. Duraboost AGM High-Performance Battery CTX20HL-BS: $100
  9. Yuasa High-Performance AGM Battery: $114 – $160
  10. Yuasa Factory Activated AGM High-Performance Battery: $125 – $235
  11. Shorai Lithium Battery: $90 – $300
  12. BikeMaster Lithium-Ion Battery: $63 – $320
  13. Antigravity Small Case 16-Cell 480CA Lithium Ion Battery: $290
  14. Shorai Lithium 6 Volt Battery LFX18A2-BS06: $100
  15. Trail Tech NiMH Battery Pack: $60
  16. Antigravity Small Case XPS SC-1 180CA Lithium Ion Battery: $120
  17. Megaboost Battery: $55 – $170
  18. Antigravity 6-Volt 12-Cell 240CA Lithium Ion Battery: $220
  19. ODYSSEY PC680 Motorcycle Battery: $120+
  20. Antigravity Small Case 16-Cell 480CA Lithium Ion Battery: $290
  21. Fire Power Featherweight Lithium Battery: $80 – $235

How much do the different types of motorcycle batteries cost?

There are a few different types of motorcycle batteries, and depending on what type of battery you go with, the prices will vary.

Generally, the most popular types of motorcycle batteries are lead-acid motorcycle batteries, lithium-ion batteries, and AGM batteries. So let’s take a look.

Lead-acid motorcycle batteries

Lead-acid motorcycle batteries can cost between 10$ and 170$. Lead-acid motorcycle batteries are usually the cheapest compared to AGM and lithium-ion motorcycle batteries. Generally, a good, quality lead-acid motorcycle battery can cost around $50 to $100.

Lithium-ion motorcycle batteries

Lithium-ion motorcycle batteries can cost between $60 and $400. The price will depend on the battery’s specifications. Generally, lithium-ion batteries are the most expensive out of lead-acid and AGM batteries. On average, you can expect to pay around $200 to $300 for a good lithium-ion motorcycle battery.

Absorbed glass mat motorcycle batteries

Absorbed glass mat (AGM) motorcycle batteries cost between 25$ and 250$. AGM motorcycle batteries are usually cheaper than lithium-ion batteries but more expensive than lead-acid motorcycle batteries. The cost of a good AGM motorcycle battery is about $90 to $120.

Factory activated motorcycle batteries

Inevitably you may find that some shops and dealers will also offer what is known as factory activated (FA) motorcycle batteries.

Factory activated motorcycle batteries can cost between $25 and $400. The price will depend on the type and specifications of the battery. The factory activated batteries can be lead-acid, AGM, Li-ion, and even NiMH.

These batteries come already filled with electrolyte and are ready to be used out of the box. Technically factory activated batteries are considered maintenance-free, as you do not have to worry about refilling the electrolytes or doing any other maintenance.

Gel motorcycle batteries

Gel motorcycle batteries can vary in how much they cost. Generally, Gel motorcycle batteries can cost between $15 to upwards of $350. The price will depend on the making, brand, specifications, and more.

Vintage motorcycle batteries

Riders that have older motorcycles may also find that there are vintage motorcycle batteries are also sold. These can be designed for older Harleys or other types of vintage motorcycles and may often be running at 6 Volts instead of 12 Volts.

Vintage motorcycle batteries can cost between $10 and $150. The price will vary depending on the battery’s specs and type.

Why are there price fluctuations?

If you are looking for a new replacement motorcycle battery, you may be surprised to discover that the prices of motorcycle batteries can vary wildly. 

There are various reasons why there are big price fluctuations when it comes to some motorcycle batteries.

Of course, the reputation of the manufacturer will play a certain role, but the most important factors are the built quality of the battery, how much power it can supply, how long it can last, and whether or not it is designed for a specific model of motorcycles.

Are motorcycle batteries that cost more worth it?

Most motorcyclists spend between $30 to $180 on a new motorcycle battery.

But is it worth spending more?

A more expensive motorcycle battery manufactured by a reputable brand is usually of a higher quality compared to cheaper off-brand motorcycle batteries. However, just because a battery is way cheaper does not mean it will damage a motorcycle.

The only way a cheaper motorcycle battery can damage a motorcycle is if it leaked.

A battery of lesser quality can end up sweating or leaking acid, which can cause serious corrosion damage. For example, you will need to buy a new motorcycle battery and may also need to replace the cables and repair any other damage done due to the battery’s acid, which can end up costing a lot.

That being said, cheaper motorcycle batteries may be of inferior quality and not last as long as a more expensive battery and may have less cold-cranking amps (CCA) as well.

Of course, that is not guaranteed because some off-brand motorcycle batteries can last just as long, if not even more, as OEM motorcycle batteries. Yet, at the same time, an off-brand motorcycle battery may be as much as ten times cheaper than an OEM battery.

It is not mandatory to go with an expensive motorcycle battery, however, it is worth avoiding the really cheap ones.

Additional factors that can affect the cost of a motorcycle battery

There are a few more things you need to keep in mind when it comes to motorcycle batteries and their costs. I am talking about battery maintenance and replacement costs.

Charging costs

You will need a battery charger. A motorcycle battery charger costs between $15 to $130. The price depends on the type, design, and capabilities of the motorcycle charger. Motorcycle charging stations designed to charge several motorcycles at once can cost up to $750 in certain cases.

But how much does it cost to charge a motorcycle battery?

Charging a motorcycle battery costs cents a day. Charging a nearly dead 12.6 Volt motorcycle battery can cost between 40 to 80 cents while leaving a motorcycle battery on a trickle charger can cost just a few cents a day. Charging a completely discharged motorcycle battery can cost up to $5 in this case. 

Usually, motorcycle batteries that have dropped to 0 Volts cannot be recovered, but sometimes they can come back.

If your battery happens to die on you while being away from home and you do not have a charger with you, then you can always try to jump-start it or have it recharged in a nearby service center. Charging your motorcycle battery at a service center can be expensive as they may charge you between $10 to $20.

Jump starting your motorcycle battery is usually free. You can use another motorcycle or even a car to jump start your motorcycle.

See article: Can you charge a motorcycle battery with a car?

If you have a lithium-ion motorcycle battery, things are not too different as Li-ion batteries also cost cents to be recharged.

Maintenance costs

The main things when it comes to the recurring costs of motorcycle batteries are the charging costs and the electrolyte refiling costs.

Topping up or completely refilling your motorcycle battery acid is not expensive. Generally, motorcycle battery acid (or electrolytes) can cost between $10 to $30

Replacing costs

So how much does it costs to replace a motorcycle battery?

Depending on power, size, and quality, prices for a replacement motorcycle battery range from $10 to $400. A dealership, parts store, or service center can charge $10 to $100 to install the motorcycle battery. However, many retailers may install the battery free of charge if you buy the battery from them.

Motorcycle batteries generally last between 3 to 5 years if properly maintained and looked after. So you shouldn’t have to replace your motorcycle battery too often, although batteries of lesser quality are known to fail in about 1 year or so.

Usually, you can find new motorcycle batteries at your dealer, however, the prices there will often be significantly higher than what you will pay online. This is why many owners will prefer to buy their motorcycle batteries online and install the battery themselves. That being said, good deals can also be found in the physical stores.

Mike

Hello, two-wheel enthusiasts! My name is Mike, and I am the person behind motorcyclebrave.com. I am ready to go for a ride at any time of the day (or night). There is something about motorcycles that nothing else compares to. Here I share everything that I learn about motorcycles.

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